Thursday, January 29, 2009

Save suffering pit bulls by curtailing breeding----WTF--INGRID NEWKIRK on saving PIT BULLS?!




PETA supports saving pit bulls?! Ok, yeah on a cold day in hell maybe...can you say another way to get more $$$$$ from people oblivious to what PETA is really all about....yeah, sure Ingrid, I bet you've spent a lot of time
"rescuing" pit bulls...


AS someone who has spent 25 years rescuing pit bulls from conditions we wouldn't visit on our worst enemies, I applaud the city of Lancaster's adoption this week of an ordinance requiring all pit bulls to be spayed or neutered.

Pit bull breeding bans truly are needed to protect the public as well as the pit bulls themselves, probably the most abused breed in dogdom.

Through no fault of their own, pit bulls have become the dog of choice for people who don't know or care about dogs and who want this particular dog only because a pit is a "macho" possession - a reflection of the image they want for themselves.

Most of these dogs live on chains - if you can call it living - attached to a stake, metal drum or dilapidated doghouse. To make them "mean," they are often starved and beaten. They are not social, or if they are, they are not to be trusted around children or other animals, especially small ones. They are hardheaded by nature and suffer the brunt of that trait, too, by being treated abominably.

PETA's staff has cared for a mother pit who weighed about a third of what she should have weighed - her hip, back and rib bones protruding. We euthanized her worm-infested, scared-to-death, unsocialized young pups. If someone wants a puppy, there are more than enough other puppies to choose from in local shelters - ones who will not have to go through an ordeal to be socialized.

This particular mother dog had been chained to a male pit who dragged her wherever he wanted to go on his small chain, periodically turning to attack her. She was as sweet a being as anyone could ever want, or so it seemed, but she was no sweeter or more deserving of a home than all the dogs on Death Row in shelters. Also wonderful was the male pit we found in this same yard with his chain embedded into his festering neck. The family had two more pits, and they wished to breed them and sell the pups.
This story was not unusual. We were not surprised. We also had two huge, strong "bruiser pits," as we call them, in our custody who were so difficult to handle that only a very strong person could walk them, one at a time.

They came from a yard where they lived on chains, and after we sterilized them (free of charge in our clinic), they had to go back there. They will die on those chains one day, and they are dangerous. They are fine around adult humans, but they get fixated on any small dog or cat and work as a pair if they can, equally excited and unmanageable. This is not unusual for pits. If I said this about a collie or a beagle, it would be surprising.

Please consider this: It is safer for other dogs and for small children to have a chance encounter with a poodle, cocker spaniel or mixed hound than it is for them to have one with a pit bull. Of course, that's a generalization, but it's also true.

If you had a Chihuahua or a child and someone said, "Behind Door A is a pug or a Labrador, and behind Door B is a pit; you choose which door we will open," which door would you choose? Right.

So, knowing that pits and pit mixes are responsible for more attacks than other dogs - not just fatal attacks, but ones in which an eye or limb or self-confidence is lost for life - is it right to suggest that people should continue breeding this kind of dog? Especially when other wonderful dogs are crying out for homes?

There are more reasons for pit bull breeding bans, but these are just a few.

Ingrid E. Newkirk is the president and founder of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, which can be reached via www.PETA.org.

6 comments:

Lindsay Pollard-Post, PETA Staff Writer said...

I encourage your readers to look at PETA’s Web site, http://www.peta.org/about/numbers.asp, and see how many pit bulls PETA spayed and neutered in 2007 alone at little or no cost to their guardians. For pit bulls who are forced to live outdoors, PETA provides free warm, custom-built doghouses and lightweight tie-outs that allow these neglected dogs a tiny measure of freedom. We work for justice for pit bulls by encouraging local officials to prosecute people involved in dogfighting, as well as those who otherwise neglect or abuse their animals, including by letting their dogs starve to death and freeze in the winter. When a painless death is the kindest option, our caseworkers euthanize pit bulls—including those who are old, sick, injured, or aggressive—at no cost to their guardians, instead of letting them die slowly on their chains. If you'd like to see some of the dogs PETA helps, I Am An Animal: The Story of Ingrid Newkirk and PETA (available from HBO On Demand) shows Ms. Newkirk going out to a filthy yard, giving a chained pit bull fresh water, and cleaning up debris to try to make the dog's life less miserable.

PETA's work with dogs like these has convinced us that a spay/neuter requirement for pit bulls (and all dogs—given the massive companion animal overpopulation crisis) would spare them immense suffering. That's something that anyone who has pit bulls' best interests at heart—and not simply their own selfish desire to "own" a certain type of dog or make money by breeding them—can agree on. To find out more about PETA’s work, please visit www.HelpingAnimals.com.

Jessica said...

Hmmmm....interesting but not convincing.

On Ingrid Newkirk's own words-


"Pit bulls are perhaps the most abused dogs on the planet. These days, they are kept for protection by almost every drug dealer and pimp in every major city and beyond."

"Bored juveniles sic them on cats, neighbors' small dogs and even children."

"I have scars on my leg and arm from my own encounter with a pit. Many are loving and will kiss on sight, but many are unpredictable. An unpredictable Chihuahua is one thing, an unpredictable pit another."

"People who genuinely care about dogs won't be affected by a ban on pit- bull breeding. They can go to the shelter and save one of the countless other breeds and lovable mutts sitting on death row. We can only stop killing pits if we stop creating new ones. Legislators, please take note."

Jessica said...

So, Lindsay of PETA, thanks for your post BUT I will encourage my readers to research PETA and Ingrid Newkirk for themselves.

The following link will give you LOTS of interesting information-

Ingrid Newkirk Should Resign

Anonymous said...

I agree that readers should watch the HBO special. . because the only people who wont be disgusted by Ingrid's own words are those who share her love of (killing) animals.

I can't wait till she dies so I can attend the BBQ!

No Wool Over My Eyes, kthnx said...

Lovely words Lindsay, but I'm less than impressed. If Newkirk was so bent on "protecting" these dogs then she'd go through the steps of proper education rather than doing what she did in that article- which is fear mongering, complete with mounds of logical fallacies.

"If you had a Chihuahua or a child and someone said, "Behind Door A is a pug or a Labrador, and behind Door B is a pit; you choose which door we will open," which door would you choose? Right.

So, knowing that pits and pit mixes are responsible for more attacks than other dogs - not just fatal attacks, but ones in which an eye or limb or self-confidence is lost for life - is it right to suggest that people should continue breeding this kind of dog? Especially when other wonderful dogs are crying out for homes?"

So, how is that helping us who love this breed, Lindsay? How is encouraging people to adopt other breeds and leaving APBTs to die in shelters helping us Lindsay? Despite popular belief the most common reasons dogs end up in shelters is because they weren't educated about the mannerisms of the dog they have and don't understand that dogs require a measure of proper training. But rather than accurately solve that problem, you all would rather spend the money on pro-BSL efforts and banned Superbowl ads. Fear-mongering and "compassion" may be working now, but what will happen when you start trying to BSL the Goldens or the Labs?

"Pit Bull" advocates have been breaking their backs to prove that these are good dogs who belong here, and not only make great family pets to those that are educated, but also great working dogs (which PeTA is also against) ready and eager to make a child smile at a hospital or sniff out narcotics and so far all PeTA has done is throw it in our faces with constant fear mongering of this nature. How anyone from that organization can promote the extinction of pit bulls and loving animals in the same breath is beyond me. It seems that all animals aren't created equal in PeTA's eyes after all

Anonymous said...

Thanks for posting this Jessica...
It is... So true, so sadly true.